<div dir="ltr">A number of years ago, I wondered whether the phrase "zahav tahor" (which appears many times, especially in Sefer Shemos in relation to the keilim of the mishkan) means: (A) gold that is ritually pure, either by immersion in a mikveh or by never becoming tamei to begin with, or (B) gold that is pure in the sense of having no other metals alloyed into it. I vaguely recall getting "B" as the answer here on Avodah, but I am unable to find any records of that discussion. If anyone can bring any sources, I'd appreciate it.<div><br></div><div>I was reminded of the above by a similar question in yesterday's Parshas Vayishlach. The root "tamay" appears in three separate pesukim: "Yaakov heard that he (Chamor) tim'ay¬†Dinah his daughter" (34:5). "For he (Chamor) tim'ay their sister Dinah" (34:13). "They plundered the city that tim'oo their sister" (34:27, note the plural form, suggesting collective guilt).</div><div><br></div><div>What sort of tum'ah is being referred to here? My guess is that this is NOT referring to a technical tum'as keri, which I understand to exist only among Jews. Rather, this tum'ah is of a colloquial or social sort: Chamor defiled, abused, profaned, and dishonored Dinah. But do any meforshim say this explicitly? Or is it so obvious that no one felt a need to say so?</div><div><br></div><div>I suspect (but I'm not sure) that this social defilement might appear elsewhere in the Chumash as well. For example, Devarim 24:4 - "Her first husband is not able to take her again to become his wife, after she had been defiled..." Is this a social defilement to the first husband resulting from her second¬†*marriage*, or is it a technical defilement resulting from tumas keri *during* that second marriage? (I suppose this question can be easily answered depending on whether this prohibition begins with her kiddushin to the second husband, or only after eirusin with the second husband.)</div><div><br></div><div>Sometimes words have obvious meanings, but sometimes we don't see the ambiguity until it is pointed out.</div><div><br></div><div>Akiva Miller</div></div>