<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"> P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} </style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="elementToProof">
>From today's OU Kosher Halacha Yomis</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="elementToProof">
<table class="deviceWidth" width="600" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE:14px;FONT-FAMILY:Arial, sans-serif;VERTICAL-ALIGN:top;COLOR:#333333;PADDING-BOTTOM:10px;TEXT-ALIGN:left;PADDING-TOP:10px;PADDING-LEFT:20px;LINE-HEIGHT:20px;PADDING-RIGHT:20px">
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE:20px;FONT-FAMILY:Arial, sans-serif;FONT-WEIGHT:bold;COLOR:#000;PADDING-BOTTOM:15px;TEXT-ALIGN:left;PADDING-TOP:10px;PADDING-LEFT:0px;LINE-HEIGHT:24px;PADDING-RIGHT:0px">
<p><strong><strong class="ContentPasted0">Q. This Sunday evening, December 4th, 2022, we begin reciting
<em class="ContentPasted0">Vísain Tal Umatar</em> in the <em class="ContentPasted0">
Shmoneh Esrei</em> of <em class="ContentPasted0">Maariv</em>. What happens if one forgot to say<em class="ContentPasted0"> Vísain Tal Umatar</em> and what is the
<em class="ContentPasted0">halacha</em> if one is uncertain? </strong></strong></p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<table class="deviceWidth" width="600" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE:16px;COLOR:#333;PADDING-BOTTOM:15px;PADDING-TOP:10px;PADDING-LEFT:10px;LINE-HEIGHT:1.6;PADDING-RIGHT:20px">
<p class="ContentPasted0">A. If a person said ď<em class="ContentPasted0">vísain bracha</em>Ē instead of ď<em class="ContentPasted0">vísain tal umatar livracha</em>Ē and he realized his error after ending
<em class="ContentPasted0">Shmoneh Esrei</em>, the entire <em class="ContentPasted0">
Shmoneh Esrei</em> must be repeated.</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0"><br>
</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0">If the error was caught while in the middle of <em class="ContentPasted0">
Shmoneh Esrei</em>, corrective action may be taken by inserting the phrase of <em class="ContentPasted0">
vísain tal umatar livracha</em> in the <em class="ContentPasted0">bracha</em> of <em class="ContentPasted0">
Shema Koleinu</em>, before the words ď<em class="ContentPasted0">Ki ata shomeiya</em>Ē. However, if the
<em class="ContentPasted0">bracha</em> of <em class="ContentPasted0">Shema Koleinu</em> was already completed, the individual must return to the beginning of the
<em class="ContentPasted0">bracha</em> of <em class="ContentPasted0">Bareich Aleinu</em> and use the proper phrase of
<em class="ContentPasted0">vísain tal umatar</em>.</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0"><br>
</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0">What if a person does not remember if he said <em class="ContentPasted0">
vísain bracha</em> or <em class="ContentPasted0">vísain tal umatar</em>? Since he has no recollection, we assume the
<em class="ContentPasted0">bracha</em> was recited without thought, out of habit, in the manner that he was accustomed to saying it.
<em class="ContentPasted0">Halacha</em> assumes that habits of <em class="ContentPasted0">
davening</em> are established with thirty days of repetition. As such, up until thirty days from December 4th, it can be assumed that the wrong phrase (<em class="ContentPasted0">vísain bracha</em>) was used, and
<em class="ContentPasted0">Shmoneh Esrei </em>must be repeated. After thirty days have elapsed, when in doubt,
<em class="ContentPasted0">Shmoneh Esrei</em> need not be repeated. It can be assumed that
<em class="ContentPasted0">vísain tal umatar</em> was said out of habit and second nature.</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0"><br>
</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0">The Mishna Berura (114:38) qualifies this last <em class="ContentPasted0">
halacha</em> and says that if the person intended to say ď<em class="ContentPasted0">vísain tal umatar</em>Ē in
<em class="ContentPasted0">Shmoneh Esrei</em>, and later in the day he cannot remember what he said, he need not repeat
<em class="ContentPasted0">Shmoneh Esrei</em>. This is because it can be assumed that he recited the
<em class="ContentPasted0">bracha</em> properly, since that was his intent. The fact that he cannot remember is inconsequential because people do not typically remember such details after a significant amount of time has passed. Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach,
<em class="ContentPasted0">ztĒl </em>(Shmiras Shabbos Kehilchoso 57:17) notes that each personís memory span is different. For someone whose memory is poor, the last
<em class="ContentPasted0">halacha</em> would apply even if one cannot remember soon after reciting
<em class="ContentPasted0">Shemoneh Esrei</em>.</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0"><br>
</p>
<p class="ContentPasted0">Professor Yitzchok Levine<br>
</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
</div>
</body>
</html>