<div dir="ltr">According to the people quoted in these articles<div><a href="https://afbiu.org/news/biu-futurist-predictions">https://afbiu.org/news/biu-futurist-predictions</a><br></div><div><a href="https://www.algemeiner.com/2022/08/02/according-to-demographic-numbers-israel-will-become-the-center-of-jewish-life/">https://www.algemeiner.com/2022/08/02/according-to-demographic-numbers-israel-will-become-the-center-of-jewish-life/</a><br></div><div>within┬áthe next 30 years, two-thirds of world Jewry will be living in Eretz Yisrael.<br></div><div><br></div><div>I am not aware of any significance to the number 2/3, but it is my understanding┬áthat if half of world Jewry would be in Eretz Yisrael, that would be of *great* halachic significance. Without getting into details, many halachos which are currently d'rabanan would acquire d'Oraisa status, which would in turn affect many details of those areas. And if I'm not mistaken, some halachos which are at only a minhag level (or non-operational entirely) would similarly become more important.</div><div><br></div><div>My question here is NOT about which halachos are in these categories.</div><div><br></div><div>My question is: Are the gedolim discussing this stuff? As I see it, there are at least two different questions they need to consider:</div><div><br></div><div>1) Exactly which halachos will change?</div><div><br></div><div>2) Perhaps more importantly: How will we know when this occurs? Which statistics will be considered for this question? Which demographers will we listen to?</div><div><br></div><div>I think we are all painfully aware of how little our brothers and sisters know about being Jewish. So many don't even know themselves whether they are Jewish by *any* definition. So how can WE know how many Jews are in the world?</div><div><br></div><div>There have been many similar articles in recent years about Israel becoming the center of Jewish population. What makes these two (the ones I linked to above) different is that the other articles are about reaching the halfway point, and now they're talking about two-thirds. It makes me wonder if we might already have passed the halfway point, at least according to some calculations. This is what makes me want to know what the gedolim are thinking.</div><div><br></div><div>Akiva Miller</div></div>