<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"> P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} </style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
The following is from Vision & Valor written by Rabbi Berel Wein</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
A key feature of both the Mishnah and the Talmud is that they
<div>can never be understood from the outside. As a unique work with</div>
<div>its own method of reasoning, it can be known only from the inside</div>
<div>- from the Talmud itself! So, the obvious question is, where does</div>
<div>one begin? One must struggle to get into the heart of the Talmud,</div>
<div>for only by reaching its heart can one hope to penetrate the intricacies</div>
<div>of its mental processes and appreciate the magic of its logic.</div>
<div>Since the Talmud can only be known from inside, intellect alone</div>
<div>(though certainly necessary) is insufficient to master it. Minds can</div>
speak to minds, but only hearts can speak to hearts.<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
The Talmud is a book of godly personalities and deep insight
<div>into the human condition and the world. It is a book of love, of</div>
<div>compassion, of striving spirituality and also of withering candor. It</div>
<div>is a book for the masses, but it is again a book only for the few. It</div>
<div>has simple wisdom on its surface and majestic mystery in its depth.</div>
<div>It is the book of love between Jews and Jews, between generations</div>
<div>and generations, between the people and the God of Israel. Therefore,</div>
<div>one who measures the Talmud by the yardstick of facts, laws,</div>
<div>and discussions alone makes a fundamental error, for that is a very</div>
narrow, and even unjust, view of this monumental work.<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
For the triumph of the Talmud and its personalities against its
<div>enemies, both within and without the Jewish people, was based</div>
<div>upon its hidden greatness and human warmth, not only on its soaring</div>
<div>intellect and wise interpretations of Jewish law. The creators of</div>
<div>the Mishnah and Talmud are the worthy successors to the prophets</div>
<div>of Israel in their vision, their fire and passion, their unsparing honesty,</div>
<div>their love for the people and God of Israel; and most of all, in</div>
<div>their almost unrealistic yet unquenchable optimism. Theirs is the</div>
<div>unshakable faith in the Torah and mission of Israel that sustained</div>
generations of Jews for centuries.<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
But perhaps the greatest contribution of the Oral Law - and of<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
the Mishnah and Talmud that now represents that Oral Law - is
<div>found in the words of Midrash itself:</div>
<div><br>
</div>
<div>"I [the Lord] do not wish to grant them the Oral Law in writing</div>
<div>because I know that the nations of the world will rule over the</div>
<div>Jews and take it away from them. Thus, the written Bible I give</div>
<div>them [now] in writing, while the Mishnah, Talmud and Aggadah</div>
<div>I grant to them orally, for when the nations of the world will</div>
<div>in the future subjugate Israel, the Jews will still be able to be</div>
<div>separate from them . .. for they [the words of the Oral Law] are</div>
<div>what will separate the Jewish people from being assimilated and</div>
<div>lost into the general society" (Midrash Rabah Shmos, chapter 47,</div>
section one).</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
Thus, even though the entire Torah, both Written and Oral,
<div>is from Sinai, the portion of Torah that is the Oral Law remains</div>
<div>solely in Jewish possession, unlike the written Bible that has been</div>
<div>co-opted by other faiths. In this way, the Oral Law has contributed</div>
<div>significantly to the survival of the Jews as a unique and vital</div>
<div>people. The Oral Law can be seen as the dividing line between Israel</div>
<div>and the nations of the world. The Written Law, the Bible, can</div>
<div>be characterized as universal: the Oral Law, as represented in the</div>
<div>Mishnah and Talmud, as particular. The genius of incorporating</div>
<div>both of these ideas and balancing them harmoniously within Judaism</div>
is testimony to the strength and truth of the Jewish faith.<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
The Oral Law is built upon the Written Torah. Though it was a
<div>product of centuries of study, writing, editing and endless review,</div>
<div>Judaism posits that the Oral Law - its structure, mechanisms, and</div>
<div>its interpretations of the Written Torah - stems from the Divinity</div>
<div>of the Revelation at Sinai. Every subject in the Talmud begins with</div>
<div>the question: "Where in the Written Torah [in the text itself] do we  </div>
find the basis for this discussion?"<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
<br>
</div>
<div style="font-family: Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" class="elementToProof">
Professor Yitzchok Levine<br>
</div>
</body>
</html>