<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"><!-- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} --></style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div id="divtagdefaultwrapper" style="font-size:12pt;color:#000000;font-family:Calibri,Helvetica,sans-serif;" dir="ltr">
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">The following is from today's OU Kosher Halacha Yomis</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><br>
</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">
<table class="deviceWidth" width="600" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" bgcolor="#efefef" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE: 14px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, sans-serif; VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; COLOR: #333333; PADDING-BOTTOM: 10px; TEXT-ALIGN: left; PADDING-TOP: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 20px; LINE-HEIGHT: 20px; PADDING-RIGHT: 20px" bgcolor="#efefef">
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE: 20px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, sans-serif; FONT-WEIGHT: bold; COLOR: #000; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px; TEXT-ALIGN: left; PADDING-TOP: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; LINE-HEIGHT: 24px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">
<em><strong></strong></em>
<p><strong>Q. Some toilets have an optical sensor and flush automatically when one walks away from the toilet. What should a person do if they find themselves on Shabbos in a place that only has automatic toilets?</strong><strong></strong></p>
<em><em><strong><strong></strong></strong></em></em></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<table class="deviceWidth" width="600" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" bgcolor="#ffffff" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; COLOR: #333; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px; PADDING-TOP: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 10px; LINE-HEIGHT: 1.6; PADDING-RIGHT: 20px">
<p>A. Rav Belsky, <em>ztl</em> (Shulchan HaLevi 7:7) discusses this question and rules that if there is no other option, it is permitted to use such a toilet. He explains that activating the toilet by movement of ones body is referred to in
<em>halacha</em> as <em>kocho</em> (literally, ones power.) For example, if one tears a cloth with their hands, that is a direct
<em>melacha</em>, but if one shoots an arrow through a cloth, that is <em>kocho</em>. On a Torah level, one is liable in both cases, but regarding Rabbinic prohibitions there is a difference. The Gemara (Shabbos 100b) permits pouring waste water onto the side
 of a boat and letting it run off into the sea (<em>kocho</em>). The Ritva (Shabbos 100b) explains that pouring waste water directly into the sea is a rabbinic violation (carrying from a private domain to a
<em>karmalis</em>). Nonetheless, Chazal permitted this due to the consideration of <em>kavod habriyos</em> (human dignity), so long as it is done indirectly, by means of
<em>kocho</em>. Similarly, in the case of one who must use an automatic toilet, it is permitted because of
<em>kavod habriyos</em>, since it is activated indirectly by means of <em>kocho</em>. One must be mindful that if lights turn on when one enters the bathroom, then it is forbidden to do so. One cannot violate a Torah prohibition even in a situation of
<em>kavod habriyos</em>.</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
</p>
</div>
</body>
</html>