<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"><!-- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} --></style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div id="divtagdefaultwrapper" style="font-size:12pt;color:#000000;font-family:Calibri,Helvetica,sans-serif;" dir="ltr">
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">From today's OU Kosher Halacha Yomis</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><br>
</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">
<table class="deviceWidth" width="600" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" bgcolor="#efefef" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE: 14px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, sans-serif; VERTICAL-ALIGN: top; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; COLOR: #333333; PADDING-BOTTOM: 10px; TEXT-ALIGN: left; PADDING-TOP: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 20px; LINE-HEIGHT: 20px; PADDING-RIGHT: 20px" bgcolor="#efefef">
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE: 20px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, sans-serif; FONT-WEIGHT: bold; COLOR: #000; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px; TEXT-ALIGN: left; PADDING-TOP: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; LINE-HEIGHT: 24px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px">
<strong></strong>
<p><strong>Q. I found an old set of pots in my parents' basement. They have not been used in many years. No one remembers if they were
<em>milchig</em> or <em>fleishig</em>. I would like to use them for <em>milchig</em>. May they be
<em>kashered</em> and used for <em>milchig</em>?</strong></p>
<strong></strong></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<table class="deviceWidth" width="600" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" bgcolor="#ffffff" align="center">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; COLOR: #333; PADDING-BOTTOM: 15px; PADDING-TOP: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 10px; LINE-HEIGHT: 1.6; PADDING-RIGHT: 20px">
<p>A. Rabbi Akiva Eiger (Commentary on Nidah 27a) writes the pots may be designated for meat or dairy without
<em>kashering</em>. The pots have not been used in more than 24 hours. After 24 hours any taste that was absorbed in the pot becomes foul, and on a Torah level the pot can be used for meat or dairy without
<em>kashering</em>. Nevertheless, there remains a Rabbinic obligation to <em>kasher</em> pots even after 24 hours have elapsed. However, in this case, we may apply the principal of ď<em>safek dírabbanan líkula</em>Ē (in cases of doubt that pertain to a Rabbinic
 prohibition one may be lenient). Additionally, Igros Moshe (Y.D. II:46) writes that if a utensil is not used for more than a year, there is an opinion that holds that it does not need
<em>kashering</em>. Although we donít follow this opinion, it can act as an additional mitigating factor. However, since one can avoid the doubt by
<em>kashering</em> the pot, it is proper to do so. Although the Magen Avrohom (OC 509:11) writes that the custom is not to permit
<em>kashering</em> a <em>fleishig</em> pot to use it for <em>milchig</em>, in this case
<em>kashering</em> is acceptable since it is only a <em>chumra</em> (extra stringency).</p>
</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<br>
</p>
</div>
</body>
</html>